Selected Publications

Kalavalapalli S, Bril F, Koelmel JP, Abdo K, Guingab J, Andrews P, Li WY, Jose D, Yost RA, Frye RF, Garrett TJ, Cusi K, Sunny NE. (2018) Pioglitazone improves hepatic mitochondrial function in a mouse model of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 315(2): E163-E173. PMID: 29634314.

Sunny NE, Bril F, Cusi K. (2017) Mitochondrial Adaptation in Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease: Novel Mechanisms and Treatment Strategies. Trends Endocrinol Metab. 28(4): 250-260. Review. PMID: 27986466.

Patterson RE, Kalavalapalli S, Williams CM, Nautiyal M, Mathew JT, Martinez J, Reinhard MK, McDougall DJ, Rocca JR, Yost RA, Cusi K, Garrett TJ, Sunny NE. (2016) Lipotoxicity in steatohepatitis occurs despite an increase in tricarboxylic acid cycle activity. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 310(7): E484-94. PMID: 26814015.

Satapati S, Kucejova B, Duarte JA, Fletcher JA, Reynolds L, Sunny NE, He T, Nair LA, Livingston K, Fu X, Merritt ME, Sherry AD, Malloy CR, Shelton JM, Lambert J, Parks EJ, Corbin I, Magnuson MA, Browning JD, Burgess SC. (2015) Mitochondrial metabolism mediates oxidative stress and inflammation in fatty liver. J Clin Invest. 125(12):4447-4462. PMID: 26571396, PMCID: PMC4665800.

Sunny NE, Kalavalapalli S, Bril F, Garrett TJ, Nautiyal M, Mathew JT, Williams CM, Cusi K. (2015) Crosstalk between branched chain amino acids and hepatic mitochondria is compromised in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 309(4):E311- E319. PMID: 26058864, PMCID: PMC4537921.

Satapati S*, Sunny NE, Kucejova B, Fu X, He T, Mendez-Lucas A, Shelton JM, Perales JC, Browning JD, Burgess SC. (2012) Elevated TCA cycle function in the pathology of diet induced hepatic insulin resistance and fatty liver. J. Lipid Res. 53(6) 1080-1092.  PMID: 22493093.

Sunny NE, Parks EJ, Browning JD, Burgess SC. (2011) Excessive hepatic mitochondrial TCA cycle and gluconeogenesis in humans with nonalcoholic fatty liver disease(link is external). Cell Metab.14: 804-810. PMID: 22152305; Highlighted by Nature Reviews Endocrinology, Mitochondrial pathways in NAFLD. Highlighted by Science Daily, Fatty livers are in overdrive.

Sunny NE, Bequette BJ. (2011) Glycerol is a major substrate for glucose, glycogen and non essential amino acid synthesis in late term chicken embryos. J. Anim. Sci. 89: 3945-3953. PMID: 21764833.

Sunny NE, Satapati S, Fu X, He T, Mehdbeigi R, Spring-Robinson CL, Duarte J, Potthoff M, Browning J, Burgess SC. (2010) Progressive adaptation of ketogenesis in mice fed a high fat diet. Am J Physiol Endocrinol Metab. 298 (6) E1226-35. PMID: 20233938; PMCID: PMC2886525

Sunny NE, Bequette BJ. (2010) Gluconeogenesis differs in developing chick embryos derived from small compared with typical size broiler breeder eggs. J. Anim. Sci. 88:912-921. PMID: 19966165

Sunny NE, Owens SL, Baldwin VI RL, El-Kadi SW, Bequette BJ. (2007) Salvage of blood urea nitrogen in sheep is highly dependent upon plasma urea concentration and the efficiency of capture within the digestive tract. J. Anim. Sci. 85:1006–13. PMID: 17202392

Bequette BJ, Sunny NE, El-Kadi SW, Owens SL. (2006) Application of stable isotopes and mass isotopomer distribution analysis to the study of intermediary metabolism of nutrients. J. Anim. Sci. 84(E. Suppl.):E50–9. PMID: 16582092

 

SZPZ2605 (2)
Nishanth E. Sunny, PhD Principal Investigator

With a degree in Veterinary Medicine from Kerala, India, Dr. Sunny came to University of Maryland, College Park in 2002 where he earned his M.S. (2005) and Ph.D. (2008) in Animal Nutrition, under the mentorship of Dr. Brian J. Bequette. Following a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center, Dallas  (2008-2010) under Dr. Shawn C. Burgess, Dr. Sunny continued as a Research Assistant Professor (2012-2016) at the Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes, and Metabolism at University of Florida, Gainesville. Dr. Sunny is currently an Assistant Professor at the University of Maryland, College Park since Jan 2017. Dr. Sunny is interested in understanding the metabolic mechanisms modulating growth and development in various species, and also contributing to the etiology of obesity, insulin resistance, and fatty liver disease.

 

Meghan
Meghan L. Maguire, PhD Postdoctoral Associate

Dr. Maguire earned a Master’s degree in Biomedical Sciences in 2008 from Edinburgh Napier University, Scotland under Dr. Mick Rae, focusing on fetal development of the pancreas and the effect of excess maternal testosterone on insulin production. She then earned her Ph.D. in Endocrinology and Reproductive Physiology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2017, under Dr. Colin Jefcoate, examining the overlapping effects of maternal vitamin A deficiency and deletion of cytochrome P450 1B1 on liver development and its modulation of obesity.  Dr. Maguire began as a Postdoctoral Scholar in the Sunny Lab in April 2017, where her focus is to interrogate mitochondrial mechanisms in the liver, contributing to obesity and fatty liver disease.

 

shafeekh
Muhammed Shafeekh Muyyarikkandy, PhD Postdoctoral Associate

Dr. Muyyarikkandy graduated with a degree in Veterinary Medicine from Kerala Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, India in 2013. He then joined the University of Connecticut in 2014 and earned his M.S. and Ph.D. in 2018 under the mentorship of Dr. Amalaradjou. His research was focused on studying the effect of probiotics in modulating in Salmonella pathogenesis. In addition, he received Northeast SARE graduate student research grant and investigated the impact of early in ovo probiotics administration to promote embryonic development and post-hatch growth of chickens. Dr. Muyyarikkandy started as a postdoctoral associate in Dr. Sunny lab in September 2018, where his research is aimed at understanding the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in the pathophysiology of liver diseases.

 

Chaitra
Chaitra Surugihalli, MS Doctoral Student

Following her Bachelors degree in Biotechnology from Visvesvaraya Technological University, Belgaum, India, Chaitra came to United States and completed her M.S. in Molecular Cell biology from University of Connecticut, Storrs. Chaitra’s research goal in the Sunny lab is to profile the metabolic adaptation of developing chicken embryos to neonatal chicks, with the objective of understands the regulatory aspects of mitochondrial metabolism and lipogenesis.

Sunny lab: Uncovering the Secrets of the Mitochondria

Mitochondria, considered the powerhouse of our cells, integrates nutrient metabolism and energy production to maintain normal cell function. Optimal mitochondrial function promotes growth and development, while mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of the metabolic diseases including obesity, diabetes and fatty liver. Sunny lab focuses on identifying strategies to enhance mitochondrial function targeted towards a) healthy growth and development and b) treatment of metabolic diseases. Sunny lab utilizes a variety of in vitro cell culture systems with in vivo animal models to tease out mechanisms regulating the mitochondrial function. These animal models include diet-induced/ transgenic mice models to probe mitochondrial dysfunction during metabolic disease and novel developing chicken embryo/ neonatal chick model to probe metabolic transition of mitochondrial networks during growth and development. Sunny lab profiles mitochondrial metabolism utilizing a combination of techniques including the state-of-the-art stable isotope based metabolic flux analysis, targeted metabolomics and tissue protein and gene profiling.

Sunny lab: Uncovering the Secrets of the Mitochondria

Mitochondria, considered the powerhouse of our cells, integrates nutrient metabolism and energy production to maintain normal cell function. Optimal mitochondrial function promotes growth and development, while mitochondrial dysfunction is a key feature of the metabolic diseases including obesity, diabetes and fatty liver. Sunny lab focuses on identifying strategies to enhance mitochondrial function targeted towards a) healthy growth and development and b) treatment of metabolic diseases. Sunny lab utilizes a variety of in vitro cell culture systems with in vivo animal models to tease out mechanisms regulating the mitochondrial function. These animal models include diet-induced/ transgenic mice models to probe mitochondrial dysfunction during metabolic disease and novel developing chicken embryo/ neonatal chick model to probe metabolic transition of mitochondrial networks during growth and development. Sunny lab profiles mitochondrial metabolism utilizing a combination of techniques including the state-of-the-art stable isotope based metabolic flux analysis, targeted metabolomics and tissue protein and gene profiling.